Latest research on the effects of oral feeding while on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in preterm infants

Dumpa, V., Kamity, R., Ferrara, L., Akerman, M., & Hanna, N. (2020). The effects of oral feeding while on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in preterm infants. Journal of Perinatology, 1-7.

Louisa Ferrara, PhD SLP contributes to the science that underpins our growing understanding of the potential risks of asking preterm infants to PO feed while they continue to require NCPAP. This information will inform your practice in the NICU and can promote needed discussion among members of the NICU interdisciplinary team

Objective To determine whether delaying oral feeding until coming off NCPAP will alter feeding and respiratory-related morbidities in preterm infants.

Design In this retrospective pre–post analysis, outcomes were compared in two preterm infant groups (≤32 weeks gestation).

Infants in Group 1 were orally fed while on NCPAP, while infants in Group 2 were only allowed oral feedings after ceasing NCPAP.

Results Although infants in Group 2 started feeds at a later postmenstrual age (PMA), they reached full oral feeding at a similar PMA compared with Group 1. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between the duration of oral feeding while on NCPAP and the time spent on respiratory support in Group 1.

Conclusions:  Delayed oral feeding until ceasing NCPAP did not contribute to feeding-related morbidities. We recommend caution when initiating oral feedings in preterm infants on NCPAP without evaluating the safety of the infants and their readiness for oral feedings.

Pursuing Certification in Lactation

My colleague Mary Lou Sorey, MS/CCC-SLP, IBCLC is a guest columnist. She has provided services in pediatrics and specifically in the NICU for many years at University of Mississippi Medical Center. Her post provides some very helpful answers to a frequently posed question: “What is the best way to pursue certification in the field of lactation in lactation?” Her thoughtful comments follow.

As a certified SLP and IBCLC (International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant) now practicing in a Level IV NICU, I have often been asked by my colleagues about pursuing certification in the field of lactation. Most want to know how to go about obtaining this additional certification, as well as if I have found it to be beneficial in my practice.

I have found the certification to be helpful, and the education most fascinating! I have used this education/certification in various ways over the years. On occasion, I have been allowed to initiate first feedings with preemie babies at the breast when MD allows, and hopefully this will become more prevalent in our unit with ongoing education regarding the benefits of this practice. We have lactation consultants in our hospital that follow the moms who deliver here, so I am typically not directly involved with those moms. I do, however, ask all of my patient’s moms who are providing EBM for their babies about pumping, make suggestions for increasing milk supply, and troubleshoot problems that may warrant further referral to our lactation consultants. This has been especially helpful for the moms who didn’t deliver at our hospital and don’t have one of our lactation consultants following them. 

There are several different lactation certifications that one can pursue, i.e. Certified Lactation Educator (CLE), Certified Lactation Consultant (CLC), Certified Breastfeeding Counselor (CBC), or International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), each with its own set of educational and/or clinical requirements.

The one I am most familiar with is the IBCLC offered through the IBLCE (International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners). The IBLCE offers three different certification pathways from which to choose but requires all candidates to complete 14 health science courses (either as an IBLCE Recognized Health Care Professional OR complete coursework in each subject) and 90 hours of lactation education. The IBCLC exam is required for certification, which is maintained by submitting continuing education hours (called CERPS) after the first 5 years, and by retaking the board exam every 10 years from date of certification. Specific information for each pathway can be found at https://iblce.org.

Here are some excellent resources for obtaining more information and education for those who are interested in pursuing certification in the various areas of lactation.