Problem-Solving with Catherine

Question: I need help brainstorming possible etiologies for chronic vomiting/regurgitation with a 3 year old.

Medical hx is significant for 36 week prematurity, hypoplastic left heart syndrome now s/p Fontan on 6/16. On 6/18, pt w/new onset left side weakness; imaging found hypoxic injury and watershed infarct. PMH also significant for submucosal cleft palate and GT dependence. Chart review revealed ongoing ST to address feeding issues from infancy, including oral aversion and decreased oral motor development, both now resolved. Parents report pt is interested in PO feeding and will put all textures in his mouth but chews them and pockets rather than swallowing because he is afraid of vomiting. Assessment revealed mild OM weakness but adequate lingual lateralization and chewing skills. Initial PO trials were with preferred foods (smooth puree and water via straw). After very small volumes (less than a teaspoon of each), pt regurgitated the food/liquid which subsequently expelled everything else he had “eaten” via GT up to 2.5 hours earlier. The gag did not happen until after pt had safely swallowed on both trials (separate events with puree and liquid). Parents report that this happens several times a day and that pt also vomits without PO intake (just GT feeds) but that is less common. Pt has had several MBSS which revealed functional pharyngeal skills (oral skills were lacking in one but that was some time ago). The only UGI pt has had was when he was an infant, as part of the work up for GT but they presented contrast via NGT and only viewed stomach and beyond. Therefore, today, I asked for an esophagram to rule out structural or functional issues in the upper GI sections. This test was negative.

These parents are so frustrated and don’t know why their son is vomiting all the time. What I witnessed did not appear to be related to sensory/behavioral (texture aversion) or swallow dysfunction. I was wondering about UES dysfunction or esophageal pouch/diverticulum but the radiologist did not see evidence of those today. Any suggestions??

Answer:
There may be a variety of GI issues to consider as part of the differential. You don’ t mention if he also received a Nissen at the time in infancy when his G-Tube was placed; if so this may be part of the puzzle, especially considering the vomiting after G-Tube feedings. His diagnosis of HLHS and multiple surgeries, and subsequent post-cardiac surgery GI complications are quite common, as Shaunda suggested. The lower branch of the vagus can wreak havoc with many of our babies and children post-op. Given his history and pre-morbid feeding challenges (oral aversion, oral-motor problems), there may now be an exacerbation of those premorbid challenges. Given that he must have had some kind of post-op event on or prior to 6/18 that resulted in a documented hypoxic injury and watershed infarct, I wonder if there may also be some alterations in pharyngeal and/or upper esophageal function that may be also part of the etiology. What I mean is that even though there is a strong case for GI issues as a part of your differential, there are apparent recent neuro ones too that, along the swallow pathway, may alter both pharyngeal and upper esophageal (especially UES) swallow function. You mentioned he has had several swallow studies but has there been once since the onset of left sided weakness and the watershed infarct and cardiac repair? This would be a great opportunity to objectify both pharyngeal and upper esophageal swallowing physiology with at least the puree and liquid he clinically appeared to swallow well. His complex history and the recent post-op event suggest to me the need for a current instrumental assessment. Because the UGI is a moment in time, and that his is such a complex presentation, a test result such as a “negative UGI” may not tell the whole story. Perhaps during the swallow study, you may also capture an incidental finding related to GI function, and given the focus on dynamic swallowing in the swallow study (versus what they may focus on in an UGI), you may be able to gather needed data about both pharyngeal and upper esophageal function. The combination of his multiple co-morbidities, and their interaction, is likely quite complex, and the data from a swallow study may help inform the entire team’s perspectives.
Catherine

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s